AHA Enduring Webinar: Spotlight Series: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Hypertension: Beginning the Conversation
Case based, live education addressing racial and ethnic disparities in hypertension. African Americans are significantly more likely than whites to be diagnosed with hypertension yet are significantly less likely to achieve blood pressure goals despite equal or even higher levels of treatment. Medication adherence, economic issues, patient/physician communication, and differences in antihypertensive efficacy in blacks all contribute to these disparities. It is crucial that clinicians identify opportunities for improvement in the management of hypertension in their African-American patients and integrate those opportunities into their practices.
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AHA Enduring Webinar: Spotlight Series:  Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Hypertension; Beginning the Conversation


Participation and Successful Completion

The following elements must be completed to claim credit:

  1. View the content in its entirety.
  2. Complete a post-test with a minimum score of 80%.
  3. Complete a survey of your learning experience.


Description

African Americans are significantly more likely than whites to be diagnosed with hypertension yet are significantly less likely to achieve blood pressure goals despite equal or even higher levels of treatment. Medication adherence, economic issues, patient/physician communication, and differences in antihypertensive efficacy in blacks all contribute to these disparities. It is crucial that clinicians identify opportunities for improvement in the management of hypertension in their African-American patients and integrate those opportunities into their practices.


Learning Objectives 

At the completion of this course, the learner will be able to:

  1. Describe disparities in the epidemiology and management of hypertension in African Americans.
  2. List underlying reasons for disparities in hypertensive management in African Americans.
  3. Identify barriers to medication adherence in African-American patients with hypertension.
  4. List opportunities in their practice to overcome medication adherence barriers in minority patients with hypertension.    
  5. Describe the components of patient-centered communication.
  6. Integrate patient-centered communication into their interactions with all patients, particularly minority patients.
  7. Apply current guidelines and algorithms for the medical management of hypertension in African Americans.


Course Agenda

Time

Presentation Title

Faculty

Corresponding learning Objective (list by number)

60 minutes

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Hypertension; Beginning the Conversation

Keith C. Ferdinand

1-7




Faculty

Keith C. Ferdinand, MD, FACC, FAHA
Tulane University SOM
New Orlean, LA


Target Audience

Physicians -
Family practice physicians, primary care physicians, cardiologists, physician assistants and clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with or at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD)

Nurses -
Nurse Practitioners and nurses involved in treatment of patients with or at risk for CVD

Pharmacists -
Pharmacists involved in treatment of patients with or at risk for CVD


Accreditation Statements:

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE:  02/05/2015

TERMINATION DATE:  06/08/2019

LAST REVIEW DATE: May 2016

JOINT ACCREDITATION TERM: 06/09/2016 – 06/08/2019

The American Heart Association is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

AMA Credit Designation Statement - Physicians

The American Heart Association designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA Credit Acceptance Statement – Physician Assistants

AAPA accepts certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician assistants may receive a maximum of 1.00 hour of Category I credit for completing this program.

AANP Credit Acceptance Statement – Nurse Practitioners

American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) accepts AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

**AMA Credit must be claimed within 6 months of attendance. CME/CE will no longer be available to claim for this activity after six months of attending.

ANCC Credit Designation Statement - Nurses

The maximum number of hours awarded for this CE activity is 1.00 contact hour.

**ANCC Credit must be claimed within 6 months of attendance. CME/CE will no longer be available to claim for this activity after six months of attending.

ACPE Credit Designation Statement - Pharmacists

ACPE Credit: 1.00 Contact Hour  |  Universal Program Number: 0256-0000-16-844-H01-P

**ACPE Credit must be claimed within 30 days of attendance. ACPE credit will no longer be available to claim after one month of attending.


Disclosures

All persons who develop and/or control educational content in CME/CE activities provided by the American Heart Association will disclose to the audience all financial relationships with any commercial supporters of this activity as well as with other commercial interests whose lines of business are related to the CME/CE-certified content of this activity.  In addition, presenters will disclose unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices discussed in their presentations.  Such disclosures will be made in writing in course presentation materials.

Faculty Member

Employment

Research Grant

Consultant/
Advisory Board

Stock Shareholder (directly purchased)

Honoraria

Other

Speaker’s Bureau

Keith C. Ferdinand, MD, FACC, FAHA

Tulane University SOM

Daiichi Sankyo, Forest

Novartis, Merck, Daiichi Sankyo, Astra Zeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Amgen, Sanofi

None

None

Takeda, Novartis, Astra Zeneca

Angela Brown, MD, FASH

Washington University School of Medicine

None

Lundbeck

None

None

Forest Laboratories, Novartis, Takeda, Arbor

Daniel T. Lackland, DrPH

Medical University of South Carolina

None

None

None

None

Member Eight Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 8) and the work group for the NHLBI Clinical Guidelines for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction (Global Risk Assessment)

 

Jan Basile, MD

Medical University of South Carolina

NHLBI

Amgen, Arbor, Eli-Lilly, Janssen, Medtronic, Recor

None

None

None

John Flack, MD, MPH, FAHA, FACP, FASH

Southern Illinois Univ.

Daiichi Sankyo, Sanofi Aventis, Novartis, Medtronic

Glaxo Smith-Kline, NIH, Daiichi Sankyo, Boehringer Ingelheim, Medtronic, Novartis, Back Beat Hypertension, Back Beat Medical, Bayer, Forest, Astra Zeneca, Amgen, Sanofi

None

None

Novartis, Daiichi Sankyo, Boehringer Ingelheim

Kathy Berra, MSN, NP-C

Stanford University School of Medicine

None

None

None

None

None

Kenneth Jamerson, MD

University of Michigan Health System

NIH, NIDDK, Novartis

Boehringer Ingelheim, Forest Pharmaceuticals, Novartis

None

None

Daiichi Sankyo

Patricia Lane, MBA, BSN

Bon Secours Virginia Health System

None

None

None

None

None

Marcia Murphy, DNP, ANP, FAHA

Rush University Medical Center

None

None

None

None

None

Kevin Thomas, MD

Duke University Medical Center

None

None

None

None

None

 This table represents the relationships of this educational activity’s faculty members that may be perceived as actual or reasonable perceived conflicts of interest as reported on the Disclosure Questionnaire which all AHA volunteers are required to complete and submit. The focus is on relevant financial relationships with commercial interests in the 12-month period preceding the time that the individual is being asked to assume a role controlling content.

 

Medium

This activity is a live or a virtual link activity depending on the location.

Hardware/Software Requirements

Internet Explorer 7 or greater
Firefox (Latest Version)
Google Chrome
Windows 7 or above
Safari (Latest Version)
Adobe Acrobat Reader 
Internet Explorer is not supported on the Macintosh.
Mac OS 10.4

Contact Information

To contact the American Heart Association for any questions, please call our customer support center at 888-242-2453.

Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality

Please see the privacy link at the bottom of the Professional Education Center.

Copyright Information

Please see the link at the bottom of the Professional Education Center.


Commercial Support

This activity is supported by an independent medical educational grant from Novartis Pharmaceuticals.

Type:  Internet Activity (Enduring Material)
FREE
Activity Price
211 Registered Users
Credits
1 Credits> Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education> AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

1 Contact Hours> Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education> ACPE

0 Credits> American Heart Association> AHA

1 Contact Hours> American Nurses Credentialing Center> ANCC

1 Credits> Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education> Attendance Credit