Health Disparities
Explore factors which can result in health disparities and impact health outcomes.
View Activity Information

Health Disparities

 

Participation and Successful Completion

Successful completion of this CE activity includes the following:

  1. Register and view the course online.
  2. View the content in its entirety.
  3. Complete a post-test with a minimum score of 80%.
  4. Complete a survey of your learning experience.
  5. Print your CME/CE Certificate from your own printer.

 

The link to the CME/CE “Lifelong Learning Center” website is learn.heart.org.

 

Registration Fee

$30.00

 

Hardware/Software Requirements

Internet Explorer 7 or greater

Firefox (Latest Version)

Google Chrome

Windows 7 or above

Safari (Latest Version)

Adobe Acrobat Reader

Internet Explorer is not supported on the Macintosh.

Mac OS 10.4

 

Target Audience

Physicians -
Researchers as well as public health practitioners and clinicians. areas of focus- physicians, epidemiologists, dietitians, nutritional scientists, exercise physiologists, behavioral scientists, biostatisticians, pharmacists, physician assistants, nurses, school health professionals and other health scientists.                            

Nurses -
Researchers as well as public health practitioners and clinicians. areas of focus- physicians, epidemiologists, dietitians, nutritional scientists, exercise physiologists, behavioral scientists, biostatisticians, pharmacists, physician assistants, nurses, school health professionals and other health scientists.

 

Description

Explore factors which can result in health disparities and impact health outcomes.

 

Learning Objectives 

At the completion of this online course, the learner will be able to:

  1. Recognize opportunities to address modifiable risk factors for CVD, to help meet AHA components of ideal cardiovascular health.
  1. Explore the causes and health consequences of continuing disparities in CVD risk factors among certain racial/ethnic, age, gender, and socioeconomic groups.

 

Course Agenda

Time

Presentation

18 minutes

Perceptions of Neighborhood Environment are Associated with Shorter Telomere Length in African American Women

18 minutes

The Impact of Food Taxation and Subsidy Policies on Cardiometabolic Disparities in the US

14 minutes

Technology Fluency is Not a Barrier to User Adoption of a Mobile Health (mHealth) Wrist-worn Physical Activity (PA) Monitor System: Observations From the Washington, D.C. Cardiovascular (CV) Health and Needs Assessment

20 minutes

Widening Rural Disadvantage in United States Premature Heart Disease Mortality: Trends by Region and Race/Ethnicity, 2000 - 2013

14 minutes

Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines: Does the Association Differ by Race/Ethnicity?

14 minutes

Socioeconomic Correlates of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

 

Faculty

Samson Y. Gebreab

National Human Genomics Institute, NIH

 

Jose L Penalvo

Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Tufts University

 

Leah R. Yingling

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

 

Elizabeth B. Pathak, PhD, MSPH, FAHA

National Center for Health Statistics

 

Stella S. Yi, PhD, MPH

Department of Population Health

Center for the Study of Asian American Health

 

Nancy Min

AHA Lifestyle/Epi Council

 

Accreditation Statements

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE:  03/01/2016

TERMINATION DATE:  02/28/2019

LAST REVIEW DATE: March 2016

JOINT ACCREDITATION TERM: 03/01/2016 – 02/28/2019

The American Heart Association is accredited by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

AMA Credit Designation Statement - Physicians

The American Heart Association designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA Credit Acceptance Statement – Physician Assistants

AAPA accepts certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician assistants may receive a maximum of 1.75 hours of Category 1 credit for completing this program.

AANP Credit Acceptance Statement – Nurse Practitioners

American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) accepts AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

**AMA Credit must be claimed within 6 months of attendance. CME/CE will no longer be available to claim for this activity after six months of attending.

ANCC Credit Designation Statement - Nurses

The maximum number of hours awarded for this CE activity is 1.75 contact hours.

**ANCC Credit must be claimed within 6 months of attendance. CME/CE will no longer be available to claim for this activity after six months of attending.

Estimated Time to Complete the Educational Activity

98 minutes

 

Disclosures

All persons who develop and/or control educational content in CME/CE activities provided by the American Heart Association will disclose to the audience all financial relationships with any commercial supporters of this activity as well as with other commercial interests whose lines of business are related to the CME/CE-certified content of this activity. In addition, presenters will disclose unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices discussed in their presentations. Such disclosures will be made in writing in course presentation materials.

Faculty Member

Employment

Research Grant

Consultant/
Advisory Board

Stock Shareholder (directly purchased)

Honoraria

Other

Speaker’s Bureau

Samson Y. Gebreab

National Human Genomics Institute

None

None

None

None

None

Jose L Penalvo

Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University

None

None

None

None

None

Leah R. Yingling

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

None

None

None

None

None

Elizabeth B. Pathak

National Center for Health Statistics

None

None

None

None

None

Stella S. Yi

Center for the Study of Asian American Health

None

None

None

None

None

Nancy Min

AHA Lifestyle/Epi Council

None

None

None

None

None

Veronique Roger

Mayo Clinic

None

None

None

None

None

Norrina Allen

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

None

None

None

None

None

Wayne Rosamond

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

None

None

None

None

None

Elizabeth Selvin

Johns Hopkins University

None

None

None

None

None

Gerald Bloomfield

Duke University Medical Center

None

None

None

None

None

Christopher Gardner

Stanford Prevention Research Center

None

None

None

None

None

Alain Bertoni

Wake Forest University School of Medicine

None

None

None

None

None

Marie-Pierre St-Onge

Columbia University School of Medicine

None

Bayer, Nexalin Technologies

None

None

None

Deborah Rohm Young

Kaiser Permanente Southern California

None

None

None

None

None

Alvaro Alonso

University of Minnesota

None

None

None

None

None

Pamela Lutsey

University of Minnesota

None

None

None

None

None

Michael Grandner

University of Arizona College of Medicine

None

Bayer, Nexalin Technologies

None

None

None

Michelle Fennessy

The Ohio State University

None

None

None

None

None

Mikhail Kosiborod

Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute

Genetech, Gilead, Sanofi Aventis, Eisai, AstraZeneca, AMGEN

Sanofi Aventis, AstraZeneca, ZS Pharma, AMGEN, Takeda, Glaxo Smith Kline, Glytec, Boehreinger-Ingelheim

None

None

AMGEN

Alexis C Fazie Wood

Baylor College of Medicine

None

None

None

None

None

Gregory Nichols

Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

AstraZeneca, Merck & Co, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Novartis, Incyte Corporation

None

None

None

None

Jennifer Robinson

University of Iowa

Amarin, Amgen, Astra-Zeneca, Eli Lilly, Esai, Glaxo-Smith Kline, Merck, Pfizer, Regeneron/Sanofi, Takeda./Sanofi/

Akcea/Isis, Amgen, Eli Lilly, Esperion, Merck, Pfizer, Regeneron/Sanofi

None

None

None

Robert Ross

Queen’s University

None

None

None

None

None

Nona Sotoodehnia

University of Washington

None

None

None

None

None

Laurence Sperling

Emory University School of Medicine

None

None

None

None

None

Thomas Wang

Harvard Medical School

None

None

None

None

None

Elaine Urbina

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

None

None

None

None

None

Monik Jimenez

Harvard Medical School

None

None

None

None

None

This table represents the relationships of this educational activity’s faculty members that may be perceived as actual or reasonable perceived conflicts of interest as reported on the Disclosure Questionnaire which all AHA volunteers are required to complete and submit. The focus is on relevant financial relationships with commercial interests in the 12-month period preceding the time that the individual is being asked to assume a role controlling content.

 

Medium

This activity is an internet-based activity.

 

Contact Information

To contact the American Heart Association for any questions, please call our customer support center at 888-242-2453.

 

Policy on Privacy and Confidentiality

Please see the privacy link at the bottom of the Professional Education Center.

 

Copyright Information

Please see the link at the bottom of the Professional Education Center.

 

Commercial Support

This activity is supported by independent medical educational grants from Astra Zeneca.
Type:  Internet Activity (Enduring Material)
$30.00
Activity Price
0 Registered Users
Credits
1.75 Credits> Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education> AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

0 Credits> American Heart Association> AHA

1.75 Contact Hours> American Nurses Credentialing Center> ANCC

1.75 Credits> Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education> Attendance Credit